Listening Test Series

IELTS Lessons, written by Sam Morgan and Tom Speed

Completing a Table

We start section 2 of this listening test with a ‘Complete the Table’ question set. First, read the tips below then use them on the questions. When you finish, check our answer guide to help you with the more difficult questions. 
  1. Before answering, check how many words you are allowed to write per question.
  2. Think about what type of word goes in each gap. Should it be verb, adjective or noun?
  3. Focus on the headings and examples. These will help you to guess what you to predict what you have to write.
  4. The headings and examples will lead you through the questions as you listen. Pay attention for the examples or synonyms (words with the same meaning) of them as you listen. 
  5. Write the answers as you hear them. This way you will not forget answers and you will be ready to move forward to the next question.
  6. If you miss an answer, DON’T WORRY, focus on the next question. You do not need to get every answer correct to get a high band.
  7. Check your spelling at the end. Bad spelling costs points!

Let’s follow these tips for the questions.

Questions 12 – 17

Complete the table below.
Write NO MORE THAN THREE WORDS for each answer.
Listening Test Section2 Part 1.mp3
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Type of society/group Examples
Sports Rugby
12)
World interest Geographical
Anthropology
13)
International Students Latin American Students
14)
History Classics and Ancient History
Archaeology
Science Neuroscience
Physics
Music Rock
15)
Society of Student Musicians
16) Oil Painting
Sculpting
17) Oxfam
Amnesty

​Unsure about the answers? Have a look at our answer guide by clicking on the question boxes below.
Question 12

The speaker first talks a lot about the rugby club. Later we hear that ‘The tennis club also has a big following’.
Question 13

We can hear the speaker mention the first two relevant clubs in the table. This prepares us for the answer: ‘The Geographical, Anthropology, and linguistic clubs are good examples.’
Question 14

The speaker uses the phrase ‘International students’ then talks about the Latin American society. This gets us ready for the answer: ‘The Indonesian society is another active one on campus
Question 15

When answering this one, you must listen carefully to write ‘jazz’ and not ‘avant-garde’: ‘There are many individual music societies ranging from popular music such as rock to more avant-garde styles such as jazz.
Question 16

We should be prepared for this answer as soon as the talk about music societies finishes. We can also guess the answer quite accurately as the examples are Oil Painting and Sculpting.
​We hear that ‘Those interested in the visual arts will also not be disappointed as there are many groups for them to join. Groups such as the oil painting society and the sculpting society provide lessons and spaces for people to practice the respective artistic disciplines and at the end of the year they hold an exhibition.
Question 17

As with the previous question, we should be listening for the answer as soon as the speaker stops talking about the sculpture society. ‘In contrast to the light hearted groups are the charity groups that aim raise funds and awareness for certain charities and issues. Prominent examples of these groups are the Oxfam Society and Amnesty International Society.
​Notice that we can guess the answer to this question as the charities Oxfam and Amnesty are in the examples list. 

How did you do? Did our tips help? Remember to build speed and confidence you must practice often. Listen again to the audio and follow our tapescript below.
The Complete Tapescript

Presenter:
You are listening to the University’s digital radio station.
Here we are at the beginning of a new year, so today we’re going to find out about some of the clubs and societies you will be able to join on campus this year. Club day is Saturday and if you go to the central square of the university you will find all of the clubs running booths where you can find out information and sign up if you’re interested.
Here to tell us more about what clubs to expect is Peter from the Students Union.
Hello Peter.

Peter:
Hi Mark, thanks for inviting me on the show.

Presenter:
You’re very welcome. What clubs have we got to look forward to this year then?

Peter:
Well as we all know we have a very vibrant student body here at this university. People from all over the world with a really wide range of interests are represented. In fact, if you’re interested in something, no matter how wacky or unusual, then you can bet there will be a club for you. But let’s start with the more well-known clubs.
 
Sports societies are some of the oldest and best known on campus. The sports union is the biggest group on campus and within it, all major, and many minor sports are represented. Major sports such as rugby have a big following with 6 different teams for different levels of ability. The Rugby team has an active weekend and midweek evening schedule of games competing with the other universities in the region. The tennis club also has a big following and produced the UK university champion last year of whom we are all very proud.
 
There are many clubs that fall into the world interest category.  The Geographical, Anthropology, and linguistic clubs are good examples.
 
Connected to this are the national and regional societies which are very popular with the international students as a way of meeting others from the same country or region of the world. One of the most active of these groups is the Latin American society which often has meet ups and frequently screens movies from South America. The Indonesian society is another active one on campus which often gives out delicious, free food close to the main lecture building and hosts dancing and arts classes to inform people about the rich culture of their country.
 
There are many societies found on campus related to specific academic subjects. These are great forums to meet people with similar academic interests and to exchange ideas and make contacts.
 
As everyone knows, history is one of the subjects this university is famous for and so the classics and ancient history group and the Archaeology society are very well represented and active. The latter enables students to volunteer on archaeological digs in the local area during holiday time.
 
Science groups such as the Neuroscience society and the Physics societies regularly find guest speakers to provide free lectures on fascinating topics for members.
 
As you can imagine the arts societies are very popular amongst students of all ages and nationalities. The music society is the second biggest on campus after the sports union. There are many individual music societies ranging from popular music such as rock to more avant-garde styles such as jazz. Musicians should make sure to join the student musicians’ society in order to gain use of practice rooms and instruments provided by the university and to meet like-minded individuals to make music with.
 
Those interested in the visual arts will also not be disappointed as there are many groups for them to join. Groups such as the oil painting society and the sculpting society provide lessons and spaces for people to practice the respective artistic disciplines and at the end of the year they hold an exhibition.
 
In contrast to the light hearted groups are the charity groups that aim to raise funds and awareness for certain charities and issues. Prominent examples of these groups are the Oxfam Society and Amnesty International Society.
 
Whatever you are interested in, I can guarantee there is a society for you, so make sure you come to the main square on campus this Saturday to see what’s on offer.